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CONTENTS

CONGRATULATIONS TO . . ., 3
RECENT DEATHS;
CORRECTIONS; LEGATO NOTES: 4

LIVE EVENTS
(May 18 to October 24, 2003)

I Hear Museum Art (B.L.C./Greenfest) <> Mad Dreams and Brits (Hickey), 6
The Score's the Thing (David Cleary) <> Recitalists & Rappers (Greenfest), 7
Music for Aldous Huxley (Cleary), 8
In Sarah's Wake (Cleary), 9
Down to the C in Chips (B.L.C.), 10
Exploring the Keys (Cleary), 11
A Rave for "Vera" (Kraft), 12
At the Temple of Drama (B.L.C.), 13
This Macbeth Struts and Frets Not (Kroll), <> A Powerful Woman (Paulk), 14
A Warrior for Us All (Paulk) <> Is There a Dr. T in the House? (McDonagh), 15
Turning the World of Sound Upside-down (Liechty/de Clef Piñeiro), 16
A Classic Ascends (de Clef Piñeiro) <> Broken by Fate (Kroll), 18
An Ancient Instrument, A New Voice (de Clef Piñeiro), 19
Pushing Strings (Kroll) <> Of A Love For Music (Patella), 20
A Night with Wolfe, Ethel and Friends (Hickey) <> Grist for the Opera Mill (Lynn), 21

DOTTED NOTES
from Kroll, BLC, 22

INTERVIEW
A recent interview by broadcaster Bruce Duffie with Ruth Schonthal

SPEAKING OUT!
"Not Just Another Concert" <>
More on the "Pullet's Surprise," 24
" a decidedly poor second choice," 25

THE PRINTED WORD
It's Who You Know (Barry Drogin), 25

RECORDINGS

À outrance à la Anderson (de Clef Piñeiro) <>
"Beauty to the Limits" (Galganski) <>
He Never Sat Back (BLC), 27
Gi'me Moe Time (Cleary) <>
Monk's "mercy" (Kaye), 29
Readying the "Unready," (BLC), 30

RECENT RELEASES, 31

THE PUZZLE CORNER:
Another outstanding winner, 32

COMPOSER INDEX, 34

BULLETIN BOARD, 35

WEB SUPPLEMENT

Live Events

Equinox Chamber Players In Concert for Impact
Just In Time: Foreign Influences Brought Home
NEC Percussion Ensemble: Premieres for Percussion
Dinosaur Annex: Metaphysics and Magic
Longitude
IX International Festival for Contemporary Music

CD Reviews

Harrison Birtwistle: Refrains and Choruses
Flute Force: Eyewitness
Exchange Latin America
Outlier-New Music for Music Boxes: John Morton
Works for Flute and Piano of Louis Moyse
New American Piano Music

Obituaries

Arthur Berger (1912-2003)
Harold Schonberg (1915-2003)
Meyer Kupferman (1926-2003)

Meyer Kupferman (1926-2003)

By Leo Kraft

Meyer Kupferman died the day before Thanksgiving, 2003 at the age of 77. He had been ill for several weeks and finally his stout heart gave out.

Meyer lived life to the fullest. He was a prodigious composer, a marvelous clarinetist, a caring teacher, and the focus of a group of friends and former students who looked to him for musical leadership. His home in Rheinbeck, New York was a musical center, where he and his devoted wife Pei-Fen welcomed members of the community.

If ever a composer was an autodidact it was Meyer Kupferman. While he was aware of the major contemporary trends, he resolutely followed his own path. He found his own language at an early age, and while he deepened and broadened that, he never changed his course. An independent spirit, he performed his own music, established a company, Soundspells, to publish and record his work. Meyer was not associated with any group or camp. He was his own man. Pei-Fen and his loyal friends will carry through the unfinished recordings of his final works.

From his early days Meyer Kupferman was able to elicit the support and cooperation of many fine performers. His music was performed by Ronald Roseman, Samuel Baron, Gilbert Kalish, Catherine Rowe, and Kazuko Hayami, among others. His supporters were not limited to American musicians for he found adherence in Mexico and in the Czech Republic. Some of these appear on recordings of Kupferman’s, always adding their special combination of virtuosity and commitment.

Although (naturally) primarily interested in promoting his own music, Kupferman was also concerned with the work of his friends. For a number of years he presented an annual concert in what was then Carnegie Recital Hall. In these concerts he generously included works by as many as five of his friends, a number of which were written for the occasion. I was the beneficiary of his generosity on three occasions, and the music I wrote with Meyer in mind has a special place in my oeuvre. I cannot think of another composer with so generous an attitude toward his colleagues.

A large man with large energies and enthusiasm, Meyer Kupferman created a large body of work, which will find its place as posterity forms its judgments. He was a very definite musical presence, and will be missed.